“The Frog Prince – a tale told in rhyme” free on kindle for 5 days!

Free for 5 days on kindle – offer ends July 18th.

…Once upon a time, in a kingdom far away,
Within the castle grounds, a Princess came to play.
Neither child nor fully grown, a girl of charm and grace,
Upon the brink of womanhood and beautiful of face.

But don’t be fooled by this fair scene, no fairytale is this.
No story of a happy child, who dreams of endless bliss.
The kingdom had succumbed to grief, such darkness dwelt inside,
It spread and grew like twisted vines from which you could not hide…

The Frog Prince is a classic tale now enchantingly retold in narrative rhyme from the author of “Faerytale” (published through Safkhet Publishing). With the darkness of the original Brothers Grimm version, The Frog Prince tells the tale of a lonely Princess who makes a promise to a frog she cannot break. Forced to have him by her side within her father’s dreary castle she soon finds his company not quite as repulsive as she initially thought. But there is more to her slimy companion than meets the eye…

…Looking down the Princess cried and stared in disbelief,
For there he sat, her helpful frog, his eyes were wide with grief.
“Princess mind the pledge you made, all you said you’d do.
Let me eat from your bowl and share your food with you.”

The Princess knew not what to say, he must have come so far!
Beneath a nighttime sky so dark, despite its scattered stars.
“What is this?” the King he asked, for so confused was he,
The Princess told him of her pledge and begged to be set free.

“Of course I won’t you foolish child, your honor must dictate.
You gave your word, a pact was made. It’s really far too late!”
The Princess felt the urge to cry, there really was no choice,
“As you wish”, she replied in such a tiny voice…

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Prince-rhyme-Fairytales-Rhyme-ebook/dp/B0078K4GH8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1342281962&sr=8-1

“The Frog Prince” is the first in the series. Also available through kindle: The Pied Piper – the 2nd in the series, with more to follow…

Happily Ever After…

“In every game they played, it’s true; it always went the same,

Her little sister got upset and on her laid the blame.

Ellie loved her fairy tales, believed them to be true

And vowed she always would believe, no matter how she grew.

 

Lucy teased the dreamy girl and called her silly names,

The childish tales her sister loved, she thought them rather lame!

So when they played their little games, based on stories told,

Lucy moaned and whined throughout, for she was far too old!”

The character Ellie in my book Faerytale was based on myself when I was little, Lucy being my older sister Charlotte. She didn’t tease me quite as much as Lucy teases Ellie but I remember thinking how sad it was that, as a teenager, she no longer saw the world in the same way as I did. Fairy tales which came to life before my eyes, mystical beasts and supernatural creatures which roamed Exmoor, viewable from my bedroom window. And that sense of adventure when I played in the garden, no longer a small patch of grass but an endless desert with hidden treasure maps to be found. But I always knew there would come a day when that would change as I grew older like my sister, and to a certain extent it did. But although I no longer believed these stories with their creatures and adventures were real, I still saw them in my head, bringing life to every day experiences. As a teenager I would go to places like Dunster castle with my incredibly like-minded best friend Emily, and imagine that we lived there in a world where magic and adventure were commonplace. And when she got married there many years later I realized that fairy tales can make guest appearances in real life no matter how “real” life becomes.

And then 4 weeks ago I myself got married in Devon to my partner Carl and, for me, after so many years of losing myself in tales of fantasy and fairy tales, that day was the closest I have ever come to a real life fairy tale…and it didn’t end with the closing of a book. After the ceremony we went outside for the reception in front of the most beautiful manor house, with Exmoor providing a breathtaking backdrop. Our closest family and friends all there to share the day with us and a rock disco to come in the evening!

Standing there in the dress of my dreams created by Emily (and I promised myself I would never say anything this cheesy!) I actually did feel like a princess. With both Charlotte and Emily at my side I had married my “prince” (again, profuse apologies for the cheese), only I had something over the likes of Cinderella, Snow White, Belle etc. I got to see what life brings to me and my husband after the wedding. Because “happily ever after” has always been just a little too broad an ending for me…. 🙂

 

 

Fairy Tales on Film Week!

I came across this article a few days ago. Although it is over a year old I still found it quite an interesting read.

http://www.npr.org/2011/01/21/132705579/the-fairy-tale-struggles-to-live-happily-ever-after

Apparently Disney is starting to move away from the fairy tales they famously favored all these years. Which is strange given that their logo is a fairy tale castle! After years of churning out countless classic fairy tales they now seem less enthusiastic about continuing with these retellings, Tangled being the last one of note that did relatively well.Image

The importance of Disney in keeping an interest in fairy tales should never be underestimated. Classics such as Snow White (their first feature-length film), Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty are undoubtedly timeless and enchanting. Snow White and Sleeping Beauty in particular seemed to retain the original darkness and disturbing nature of the Brothers Grimm versions. But, as the years went on, Disney fairy tale adaptations got brighter and brighter and (in my opinion!) cheesier, for example The Princess and the Frog and Tangled. These days a lot of people would associate fairy tales such as Cinderella with the bright and happy Disney version complete with singing mice, Prince’s with whiter than white teeth and songs such as ‘Bippity Boppity Boo!’. However, their films were (maybe even unintentionally) tailored more towards younger girls who like to dress up as their favorite Disney princess and ride off with their dashing Prince. So whilst Disney has done an awful lot for fairy tales, and I myself grew up watching them too, they have also done a bit of (for want of a better word) damage to the original versions. But, as it says in the article, it appears that times have changed.

However, I have noticed a recent invasion of darker fairy tales on film, in a very distinct move away from Disney. Red Riding Hood with Amanda Seyfried, released last year, Snow White and the Huntsmen released this year with Kristen Stewart and Jack and the Giant Killer for 2013 to name a few. That’s not to say there hasn’t been a steady flow of dark and gritty fairy tales on-screen throughout the years. In fact some of my favorite childhood films are fairy tales of the more sinister persuasion. But this recent influx of ‘Grimm style’ tales only goes to show that people still want to see their childhood favorites told as they were meant to be told: as enchanting yet sometimes disturbing tales of mystery, magic and danger. And what I would like to do over the next week or so is an overview of fairy tales on film: past, present and future, focusing on those films which are loyal to the original darker and more sinister tales. 

So here we are…it’s my “Fairytales on Film” week! Join me as I go through Red Riding Hood adaptations, stop-motion features, fairy tale horrors, the future of fairy tales on film and much more!

 

Whose Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?…Anyone?

I saw this in the newspaper a few weeks ago and found it very sad.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-17024101

I think it’s such a shame these days that children are not getting to enjoy these wonderful fairy tales as they were originally written: as tales laced with danger and a sinister, dark atmosphere. In the world of the Brothers Grimm danger lurked around every corner. Children were not safe and rarely protected from evil by their parents, in fact in most cases their parents/step parents were the source of the evil. The bad guys had no shred of humanity and no back story to explain how they had become the way they were. Not all the characters were innately good, even the hero’s and heroines, and the bad guys could not always be “saved” in the end, be it through repentance or an act of self-sacrificing goodness. What’s more the main antagonists, more often that not, met with very grisly ends! The witch in Hansel and Gretel burned to death in her own oven, Cinderella’s evil stepsisters had their eyes plucked out by birds, Red Riding Hood’s wolf was brutally hacked to death by the woodsman and Snow Whites stepmother was forced to wear iron shoes and dance till she dropped dead!

Naturally it is quite right that some parents may consider these details too graphic for young children and may feel the need to tone them down, as they already have been over the years. But choosing not to tell them at all is just a bit too drastic in my opinion. These tales have been around for hundreds of years. Even the Brothers Grimm were not the original writers. They gathered their stories from various story-tellers, peasants, servants and even aristocrats who in turn had had these tales passed on to them. They really are timeless tales and they certainly didn’t do me any harm! The darkness and the danger made them more thrilling to hear and to read. These tales also convey important moral messages to children: the dangers of talking to strangers and straying from the path (Little Red Riding Hood), the destructive nature of vanity (Snow White), the repercussions of boasting and bragging (Rumpelstiltskin) and the consequences of failing to pay what is owed/ breaking a promise (The Pied Piper). 

I think one of the worst retellings I have heard so far is for Little Red Riding Hood, whereby instead of eating Grandma to snare his prey, the “Big Bad Wolf” has tea with her and Little Red Riding Hood and then goes on his merry way! Fairy tales should never be dull like that. Whilst they should always be enchanting, magical and even romantic, they should also be exciting, unpredictable, dangerous, scary, sinister and disturbing. It seems like a lot to ask from a short story doesn’t it? But trying giving Snow White, Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty another read (the original versions of course) and you’ll find all the above in those stories, which is really quite amazing isn’t it…?