“The Frog Prince – a tale told in rhyme” free on kindle for 5 days!

Free for 5 days on kindle – offer ends July 18th.

…Once upon a time, in a kingdom far away,
Within the castle grounds, a Princess came to play.
Neither child nor fully grown, a girl of charm and grace,
Upon the brink of womanhood and beautiful of face.

But don’t be fooled by this fair scene, no fairytale is this.
No story of a happy child, who dreams of endless bliss.
The kingdom had succumbed to grief, such darkness dwelt inside,
It spread and grew like twisted vines from which you could not hide…

The Frog Prince is a classic tale now enchantingly retold in narrative rhyme from the author of “Faerytale” (published through Safkhet Publishing). With the darkness of the original Brothers Grimm version, The Frog Prince tells the tale of a lonely Princess who makes a promise to a frog she cannot break. Forced to have him by her side within her father’s dreary castle she soon finds his company not quite as repulsive as she initially thought. But there is more to her slimy companion than meets the eye…

…Looking down the Princess cried and stared in disbelief,
For there he sat, her helpful frog, his eyes were wide with grief.
“Princess mind the pledge you made, all you said you’d do.
Let me eat from your bowl and share your food with you.”

The Princess knew not what to say, he must have come so far!
Beneath a nighttime sky so dark, despite its scattered stars.
“What is this?” the King he asked, for so confused was he,
The Princess told him of her pledge and begged to be set free.

“Of course I won’t you foolish child, your honor must dictate.
You gave your word, a pact was made. It’s really far too late!”
The Princess felt the urge to cry, there really was no choice,
“As you wish”, she replied in such a tiny voice…

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Prince-rhyme-Fairytales-Rhyme-ebook/dp/B0078K4GH8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1342281962&sr=8-1

“The Frog Prince” is the first in the series. Also available through kindle: The Pied Piper – the 2nd in the series, with more to follow…

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Happily Ever After…

“In every game they played, it’s true; it always went the same,

Her little sister got upset and on her laid the blame.

Ellie loved her fairy tales, believed them to be true

And vowed she always would believe, no matter how she grew.

 

Lucy teased the dreamy girl and called her silly names,

The childish tales her sister loved, she thought them rather lame!

So when they played their little games, based on stories told,

Lucy moaned and whined throughout, for she was far too old!”

The character Ellie in my book Faerytale was based on myself when I was little, Lucy being my older sister Charlotte. She didn’t tease me quite as much as Lucy teases Ellie but I remember thinking how sad it was that, as a teenager, she no longer saw the world in the same way as I did. Fairy tales which came to life before my eyes, mystical beasts and supernatural creatures which roamed Exmoor, viewable from my bedroom window. And that sense of adventure when I played in the garden, no longer a small patch of grass but an endless desert with hidden treasure maps to be found. But I always knew there would come a day when that would change as I grew older like my sister, and to a certain extent it did. But although I no longer believed these stories with their creatures and adventures were real, I still saw them in my head, bringing life to every day experiences. As a teenager I would go to places like Dunster castle with my incredibly like-minded best friend Emily, and imagine that we lived there in a world where magic and adventure were commonplace. And when she got married there many years later I realized that fairy tales can make guest appearances in real life no matter how “real” life becomes.

And then 4 weeks ago I myself got married in Devon to my partner Carl and, for me, after so many years of losing myself in tales of fantasy and fairy tales, that day was the closest I have ever come to a real life fairy tale…and it didn’t end with the closing of a book. After the ceremony we went outside for the reception in front of the most beautiful manor house, with Exmoor providing a breathtaking backdrop. Our closest family and friends all there to share the day with us and a rock disco to come in the evening!

Standing there in the dress of my dreams created by Emily (and I promised myself I would never say anything this cheesy!) I actually did feel like a princess. With both Charlotte and Emily at my side I had married my “prince” (again, profuse apologies for the cheese), only I had something over the likes of Cinderella, Snow White, Belle etc. I got to see what life brings to me and my husband after the wedding. Because “happily ever after” has always been just a little too broad an ending for me…. 🙂

 

 

Dancing to the Piper’s Tune…

As previously mentioned in my posts The Frog Prince never ranked that high in my list of favourite fairy tales, growing up. The Pied Piper however was always one of my favourites. The story is sinister, unsettling and tragic and it certainly does not end happily ever after. I’m not trying to suggest I was a creepy, disturbed child who only enjoyed tales of misery and death; I merely liked the tale because it stood out from the rest.

For me, my favourite fairy tales were split into two categories. You had tales such as Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, The Frog Prince and Cinderella. Although still dark and disturbed tales in their own right due to the Brother’s Grimm, they were still essentially romances with ‘Happily Ever Afters’ tagged onto the end. Then you had tales such as The Pied Piper, Little Red Riding Hood, Hansel and Gretel and Rumplestiltskin which did not follow the traditional romantic route and ended in violence and even tragedy. Mix these two types of stories together in a collection, as the Brothers Grimm did, and you have a truly fantastic anthology of enchanting, romantic, disturbing and brutal stories.

Back to the Pied Piper though, one of the most intriguing facts about this fairy tale is that it is based on an actual event in history. In the story Hamelin town is infested with rats. A stranger comes through the town and offers to rid them of their rats for a small fee and they accept. Playing his pipe, the piper lures the rats out of the town and takes them to a river where they drown. However, the town refuses to pay and the piper leaves promising they will regret that decision. Later that night he returns and, like the rats, lures the town’s children away and takes them to the same river where they drown. More sanitized versions have the piper shut them away in a cave until the townspeople paid up. It is quite a dark and hypnotic tale of revenge.

In the 1300s in Hamelin, Germany, it is recorded that the town “lost” their children. There was recorded to be a stained glass window in the church depicting a “pied piper” taking the children away. How they were really lost has never been verified. Some speculated that the children died, the pied piper being a manifestation of death, leading them away from this world. The inclusion of the rats in the tale naturally led to the argument that the children died of the plague. Some have even suggested the children did not die but merely emigrated or were recruited. Whatever happened to the children, their disappearance was referenced in 1384 in the town chronicles which states:

“It is 100 years since our children left.”,

The tale itself is therefore given more substance and depth, being based on a true story.

The story of a strange man luring hundreds of rats from a town through music, then returning for the town’s children to punish the adults for not paying what was owed is truly a haunting premise. What makes it more sinister is the peculiar character of the piper. It is never explained who he is, where he came from or exactly how he could lure animals and people by his music. The ambiguous and haunting nature of the tale just made it all the more fascinating to me and that is why I chose The Pied Piper to be the second in my ‘Fairy Tales in Rhyme’ series on kindle. I wanted to capture that mysterious and evocative atmosphere of the story and give it that hypnotic rhythm that only rhyme can achieve. So for those of you who, like myself, find yourself drawn to piper’s tune, please check it out at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Piper-rhyme-Fairytales-Rhyme-ebook/dp/B007GPYMEC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1332498255&sr=8-2

….Walking through the empty streets, lit by soft moonlight,

The cobbles shone a silver blue, the houses fringed with white.

And as he walked he played a tune, an eerie, haunting sound,

A ghostly mist like bony fingers crept along the ground.

 

The tune it echoed through the streets, it hung upon the air,

It spread through sewers into houses, up and down their stairs.

The tune caressed every corner within old Hamelin town.

Its melody like flowing water, within which you could drown.

 

When he reached its very edge, the town, in moonlight shone,

Thomas Bard lowered his pipe, but still the tune played on.

Tiny shadows began to move, little dots of black,

Scampered from both house and sewer, though each and every crack.

 

A thousand paws so lightly tapped a soft and rhythmic beat,

They joined together, moved as one as one, a rippling black sheet.

Thomas Bard began to walk towards the distant woods,

He wrapped his cloak around his chest, pulling up its hood….