Happily Ever After…

“In every game they played, it’s true; it always went the same,

Her little sister got upset and on her laid the blame.

Ellie loved her fairy tales, believed them to be true

And vowed she always would believe, no matter how she grew.

 

Lucy teased the dreamy girl and called her silly names,

The childish tales her sister loved, she thought them rather lame!

So when they played their little games, based on stories told,

Lucy moaned and whined throughout, for she was far too old!”

The character Ellie in my book Faerytale was based on myself when I was little, Lucy being my older sister Charlotte. She didn’t tease me quite as much as Lucy teases Ellie but I remember thinking how sad it was that, as a teenager, she no longer saw the world in the same way as I did. Fairy tales which came to life before my eyes, mystical beasts and supernatural creatures which roamed Exmoor, viewable from my bedroom window. And that sense of adventure when I played in the garden, no longer a small patch of grass but an endless desert with hidden treasure maps to be found. But I always knew there would come a day when that would change as I grew older like my sister, and to a certain extent it did. But although I no longer believed these stories with their creatures and adventures were real, I still saw them in my head, bringing life to every day experiences. As a teenager I would go to places like Dunster castle with my incredibly like-minded best friend Emily, and imagine that we lived there in a world where magic and adventure were commonplace. And when she got married there many years later I realized that fairy tales can make guest appearances in real life no matter how “real” life becomes.

And then 4 weeks ago I myself got married in Devon to my partner Carl and, for me, after so many years of losing myself in tales of fantasy and fairy tales, that day was the closest I have ever come to a real life fairy tale…and it didn’t end with the closing of a book. After the ceremony we went outside for the reception in front of the most beautiful manor house, with Exmoor providing a breathtaking backdrop. Our closest family and friends all there to share the day with us and a rock disco to come in the evening!

Standing there in the dress of my dreams created by Emily (and I promised myself I would never say anything this cheesy!) I actually did feel like a princess. With both Charlotte and Emily at my side I had married my “prince” (again, profuse apologies for the cheese), only I had something over the likes of Cinderella, Snow White, Belle etc. I got to see what life brings to me and my husband after the wedding. Because “happily ever after” has always been just a little too broad an ending for me…. 🙂

 

 

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“We read to know we are not alone.” – why reading should always be a child’s passion…

Once upon a time, as all good stories start,

There was a little girl who longed with all her heart.

To fill her world with magic, and live through stories told.

To wear those ruby slippers, to never dare grow old.

 

Her Neverland she found it books, oh how she longed to go!

But wardrobes failed to lead her to that magic land of snow.

Every thrilling tale she read, the lands they took her to

The looking glass within her mind would let her journey through.

That was the opening to my first published book Faerytale. The little girl in my book is me as I was then and as I am now. The title of this post is a quote from C.S Lewis which I have always loved for its simplicity. Reading has and always will be a passion of mine and the importance of reading for any child should never be underestimated.

When I was little my parents read to me every night, my dad read the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings to me many times over. When I was very small I had no idea what was going on apart from the fact that the story was about a little guy with hairy feet who became invisible when he put on a golden ring, but I loved his crazy voice when reading as Gollum. To this day Lord of the Rings is one of my favourite books.

Every book I have read has been of a continual source of inspiration to me, be it fairy tales, mysteries, horrors – they all filled my head with ideas and stories and gave me the passion to put them down on paper. The importance of reading and tales of imagination in my life is beyond sufficient explanation for me. It grabs you when you’re a child, before you can even read yourself, instead relying on your parents voices to guide your imagination. Then as you grow older you get to choose what type of tale to immerse yourself in. There are so many genres out there to appeal to each and every child, be it fantasy and fairy tales, action, mysteries, humour, poetry, science fiction the choices are endless and so are the benefits.

In a world of quick fixes such as video games and films reading has never been more important. Books do what computer games and films can never hope to achieve, they allow children to use and develop their own imaginations. These worlds are not given to them directly from a computer or TV screen. They dream and create these worlds within their heads as they read and even after they have finished the story. It can also give them a good start on the road to viewing reading not only as a necessity in everyday life but as a lifelong source of pleasure, be it for recreation or even professionally through writing.

Stories can free up imaginations and open up exciting new worlds of fantasy or reality. You carry these stories and characters with you into your adult years, even when you are told to put away childish things. But they are stories you go back to again and again and then through your children and your children’s children. They never lose their magic or their charm.  I have never grown tired of reading of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Dorothy on her journey to find the Wizard of Oz, and of course the never ending list of fairy tales which never seem to lose their charm or their meaning. I remember well the lessons of Little Red Riding Hood, and Snow White in the world of the Brother’s Grimm where fairy tales don’t necessarily end happily forever after.

So reading and the world that books can create in your mind, and in your children’s minds, should never be underestimated. They help shape you into the person you will become and keep you in touch with the child that you were. Everybody has room for a little adventure and magic in their life, which can be lived through the books you read, no matter what age you are or what you like to read.

Just remember, even the children in Peter Pan had to grow up someday, but Wendy, John and Michael never forgot Neverland.

“What do you get when you guzzle down sweets…?” Hansel & Gretel as a Horror Film.

Hi everyone, I hope you had a fantastic Easter and stuffed yourself silly with chocolate. Bad things seem to happen to children in fantasy stories who eat too much of the sweet stuff. Augustus Gloop in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Bruno in The Witches and of course, much earlier than that, Hansel and Gretel.

Not necessarily one of the most popular fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm but it is one of the darkest in my opinion. There are no romantic subplots like in Cinderella or Snow White, there are no kindly and caring parents or grandparents like in Little Red Riding Hood in fact in Hansel and Gretal the father is weak minded and spineless and their step mother is abusive and homicidal. The children are literally on their own. To top it off the protagonist of the story is an apparently “sweet” and bizarre old lady living in a house of sweets and gingerbread who turns out to be a cannibal! So what better fairy tale to use for a horror film?!

Hansel and Gretal (2009) is a Korean film which takes this tale and turns it into to what can only be described as a twisted, fantastical nightmare. After a car accident a lost and injured young man is aided by a young girl who takes him back to her seemingly perfect family in their perfect house in the woods. But the house holds bizarre and disturbing secrets and he soon realizes that the children are not what they seem and there is literally no way to escape. The film turns this classic tale on its head where the children are the main protagonists with an axe to grind against adults who think they are “bad children”.

Although I’d love to discuss it deeper I won’t spoil it for those who haven’t seen it as there are many unexpected twists in the story. But this film is incredibly visual and atmospheric. The children maintain an uneasy balance between cute and creepy throughout the film and the adults are suitably irresponsible and sadistic. The gingerbread house has been turned into a house of horrors with a never-ending labyrinth of an attic at the top and grounds with grotesque and unnaturally real statues of former “parents” who let them down. There is a strange mixture of fantasy and reality that is never fully explained which I found really refreshing. 

This film really sticks to the original fairy tale and, through horror, encapsulates the darkness of the story perfectly. All the themes are there from the original tale: the childrens disenchantment with adults, neglectful and even abusive parents (in this case carers), revenge, cannibalism, an oven large enough to fit a person and an abundance of cream cakes and sweets. So, all in all, a really fantastic retelling of Hansel and Gretel!

 

Fairy Tales on Film: Original Fairy Tales Part 1

So I have looked at adaptations of Little Red Riding Hood and later on I will be looking at fairy tales such as Snow White and Hansel and Gretel and how they have been translated on film. For this post, however, I would like to look at original fairy tales on film, so films which have created their very own unique fairy tale. There were too many to choose from so I have split this post into two parts. The first part will be two films from the 80s and the second part will cover two more recent original fairy tale films.

Now you may think that any fantasy film can fall under the umbrella of a ‘fairy tale’ but the choices I have made I have always considered as fairy tales due to their general storylines and the atmosphere they convey. The main connection between them is the suggestion of history behind the story and the foundations of myth, legend and folklore that push the narrative forward. Also their similarities to well known fairy tales in terms of the general themes and plot. Not to mention the many crazy, fantastical creatures, the enchanting but slightly unnerving atmosphere and that element of danger and impending darkness that runs through each of them. 

My first film from the 80s is The Dark Crystal (1982). I find it hard to find the words to express how fantastic this film truly is and how much I loved it growing up (and still do!). It’s such an incredibly dark story with a wealth of fantastical creatures. Some of them are cute and delightful like the Podlings or even beautiful and graceful like the Gelflings. The Mystics are enchanting with their aged fragility and gentleness. Then of course there’s the Skeksis, grotesque and vulture-like with their henchmen the Garthim: scary and soulless giant beetles.

The story is based on the legend of the Mystics and Skeksis who were once one race of beings but were split in two when the ‘Crystal of Truth’ was shattered: the best qualities going into the Mystics and the worst into the Skeksis. It is Gelfling Jen’s destiny to reunite them by completing the Crystal using the remaining shard. There is so much more to the story though, including the Skeksis’ sinister quest for youth by draining it from the enslaved Podling’s, the battle between them for who will be their new emperor, and Jen finding his soul mate Kira when he thought he was the last of his kind.

What truly makes this film magical is the (revolutionary at the time) seamless use of puppets for all of the characters. I strongly believe that this film is a perfect example of how CGI (no matter how much it has evolved) isn’t the be all and end all to achieve fantastical characters or situations. The puppeteer’s give their characters life and emotion through their movement. They are far more real than a CGI creation could ever be. The story itself is intricate and laced with the qualities that make dark fairy tales so captivating. A story which features an age old legend, a quest based on the main characters destiny, an evil which is scouring the land and a vivid, mystical landscape with unusual creatures and a life of its own. Partner that with the artistic genius of Brian Froud, who was the concept artist, the unique vision and style of director Jim Henson and finally a beautiful and at times dramatic soundtrack and you have a truly magical, enchanting and somewhat sinister fairy tale on film: The Dark Crystal

My second film, from the genius of Jim Henson and Brian Froud again, is Labyrinth (1986). Any film that can retain its “dark fairy tale” atmosphere whilst also accommodating David Bowie in tighter than tight leggings and ridiculously catchy pop songs is going to be classic! Significantly lighter than The Dark Crystal, Labyrinth still uses puppets for the majority of its characters, bar the stars Jennifer Connolly and David Bowie. This mixture really adds to the juxtaposition of real life and fantasy as Sarah (Connolly) enters Jareth’s (Bowie) world, which thrives within an intricate Labyrinth leading to his castle. Jareth has taken her little brother Toby in answer to a wish made by Sarah in a temper, and will turn him into a goblin unless she can solve the labyrinth in thirteen hours. The story is not as intricate or rooted in its own legend as with The Dark Crystal but it certainly retains the usual characteristics of a classic fairy tale.

Sarah, her head full of fairy tales, maintains in the beginning that she is a Cinderella-like character with a wicked stepmother who does not care for her. But in her case the wish granted to her does not end up so well as she is thrown into a world which really isn’t as wonderful as she had always dreamed it would be. Like Snow White and her seven dwarves, Sarah makes unusual friends during her quest. She is often confronted with bizarre obstacles and riddles within the Labyrinth much like Alice and her adventures in Wonderland (not strictly a fairy tale, I know!). There is even a nod to Hansel and Gretel, when Sarah tries to mark the stones with lipstick to ensure she doesn’t get lost in the labyrinth. Quite aside from fairy tales it even delves into Greek mythology, with Sarah as a modern day Persephone, being drawn into the underworld by Hades (in this case Jareth) who wants to keep her there forever. All of these themes within the plot, the cinematography and magical use of a labyrinth all contribute to another fantastic original fairy tale on film.

Both Labyrinth and The Dark Crystal were very significant influences with me when writing Faerytale and the world I wanted to create within it. Both films contain worlds which are not only mystical and fantastical, but have un unearthly presence which goes beyond the strange creatures which inhabit it. The Dark Crystal embodies a world divided in two: both light and dark, but which ultimately should co-exist together in harmony. Whereas Labyrinth depicts the classic “dreamer” who gets her wish but soon begins to realize that not all fairy tales are romantic and enchanting adventures of discovery: they can be twisted and perilous. Both fantastic examples of original fairy tales on film from the 80s with both of them capturing that quintessentially dark and disturbing fairy tale ethos.

 

 

Dancing to the Piper’s Tune…

As previously mentioned in my posts The Frog Prince never ranked that high in my list of favourite fairy tales, growing up. The Pied Piper however was always one of my favourites. The story is sinister, unsettling and tragic and it certainly does not end happily ever after. I’m not trying to suggest I was a creepy, disturbed child who only enjoyed tales of misery and death; I merely liked the tale because it stood out from the rest.

For me, my favourite fairy tales were split into two categories. You had tales such as Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, The Frog Prince and Cinderella. Although still dark and disturbed tales in their own right due to the Brother’s Grimm, they were still essentially romances with ‘Happily Ever Afters’ tagged onto the end. Then you had tales such as The Pied Piper, Little Red Riding Hood, Hansel and Gretel and Rumplestiltskin which did not follow the traditional romantic route and ended in violence and even tragedy. Mix these two types of stories together in a collection, as the Brothers Grimm did, and you have a truly fantastic anthology of enchanting, romantic, disturbing and brutal stories.

Back to the Pied Piper though, one of the most intriguing facts about this fairy tale is that it is based on an actual event in history. In the story Hamelin town is infested with rats. A stranger comes through the town and offers to rid them of their rats for a small fee and they accept. Playing his pipe, the piper lures the rats out of the town and takes them to a river where they drown. However, the town refuses to pay and the piper leaves promising they will regret that decision. Later that night he returns and, like the rats, lures the town’s children away and takes them to the same river where they drown. More sanitized versions have the piper shut them away in a cave until the townspeople paid up. It is quite a dark and hypnotic tale of revenge.

In the 1300s in Hamelin, Germany, it is recorded that the town “lost” their children. There was recorded to be a stained glass window in the church depicting a “pied piper” taking the children away. How they were really lost has never been verified. Some speculated that the children died, the pied piper being a manifestation of death, leading them away from this world. The inclusion of the rats in the tale naturally led to the argument that the children died of the plague. Some have even suggested the children did not die but merely emigrated or were recruited. Whatever happened to the children, their disappearance was referenced in 1384 in the town chronicles which states:

“It is 100 years since our children left.”,

The tale itself is therefore given more substance and depth, being based on a true story.

The story of a strange man luring hundreds of rats from a town through music, then returning for the town’s children to punish the adults for not paying what was owed is truly a haunting premise. What makes it more sinister is the peculiar character of the piper. It is never explained who he is, where he came from or exactly how he could lure animals and people by his music. The ambiguous and haunting nature of the tale just made it all the more fascinating to me and that is why I chose The Pied Piper to be the second in my ‘Fairy Tales in Rhyme’ series on kindle. I wanted to capture that mysterious and evocative atmosphere of the story and give it that hypnotic rhythm that only rhyme can achieve. So for those of you who, like myself, find yourself drawn to piper’s tune, please check it out at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Piper-rhyme-Fairytales-Rhyme-ebook/dp/B007GPYMEC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1332498255&sr=8-2

….Walking through the empty streets, lit by soft moonlight,

The cobbles shone a silver blue, the houses fringed with white.

And as he walked he played a tune, an eerie, haunting sound,

A ghostly mist like bony fingers crept along the ground.

 

The tune it echoed through the streets, it hung upon the air,

It spread through sewers into houses, up and down their stairs.

The tune caressed every corner within old Hamelin town.

Its melody like flowing water, within which you could drown.

 

When he reached its very edge, the town, in moonlight shone,

Thomas Bard lowered his pipe, but still the tune played on.

Tiny shadows began to move, little dots of black,

Scampered from both house and sewer, though each and every crack.

 

A thousand paws so lightly tapped a soft and rhythmic beat,

They joined together, moved as one as one, a rippling black sheet.

Thomas Bard began to walk towards the distant woods,

He wrapped his cloak around his chest, pulling up its hood….

Kissing the frog…

The Frog Prince wasn’t always one of my favourite fairy tales, in fact it was quite low down on my list. The princess always came across as selfish, childish and a little spoilt. I never understood why the frog wanted her so badly and the overall story lacked sentiment in my opinion. For those of you who are thinking of the Disney versions and modern retellings you would of course disagree with me. But I am referring to the original telling of the story. The Brothers Grimm bought that usual darkness to the tale which I love, but as a “romance” it really falls short. Then again, I believe it was never intended to be told as one. These days, however, the story is often used as a point of reference for romance in general, for women struggling to find love: “You have to kiss a lot of frogs before finding your prince!”

Whilst playing with a golden ball, her favourite toy, the princess drops it into a pond. Incredibly upset, she attracts the attention of a frog who offers to retrieve it for her if she promises to let him stay with her. She makes the promise knowing she has no intention of keeping it and runs away when she has her ball back. The frog follows her to the castle and begs her to keep her vow. Initially she tries to ignore the “disgusting frog” but her father, learning of her promise, forces her to keep it. After a few days of the frog following her around he turns into a prince and they marry. The end. Different versions have it happen in different ways. In some he merely changes, in the Grimm version she throws the frog against the wall in disgust. But the most famous of course is the kiss – leading to the more romantic interpretations.

For me I always assumed the story was about never judging a book by its cover. But I believe that Beauty and the Beast delivered this sentiment far more sympathetically than the Frog Prince. Although initially shocked by the Beast’s appearance and tempestuous character, Belle learns to love him for who he is and would have stayed with him even if he had never reverted back to his human form. In the Frog Prince there is a distinct lack of such sentiment. The princess never really grows to love the prince until he has changed into a far more attractive form. Naturally this is not the case in modern retellings which aim to make the story much more romantic and moralistic like Beauty and the Beast. But with regards to the original tale, The Frog Prince has never “grabbed” me as much as the others in terms of sympathy for the main characters and the moral message that they try to convey.

However, when I started to rewrite it in rhyme I began to appreciate it more. There is an understated darkness and sorrow to the tale which I had never appreciated before. The sadness and desperation of a prince trapped in a frog’s body. A lonely princess who is no stranger to solitude, starved of love and affection, finally finding companionship in the strangest of places. And then it occurred to me. A fervent champion of the Brothers Grimm over Disney, I actually discovered that the tale worked better when the two “types” were mixed together. Separately they do not work for me. The Brothers Grimm version is too unsympathetic and unsentimental. The “Disney-fied”, romantic versions are too idealistic and sugary. But a mixture of the two really works, combining the Grimm’s customary darkness and bittersweet outlook and the romance of the newer and better known versions.

My version of the tale is available on Amazon kindle through Kindle Direct Publishing, and here is a quick snippet from it below:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Prince-rhyme-Fairytales-Rhyme-ebook/dp/B0078K4GH8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1332159600&sr=8-2

…She threw the ball into the air but on the balls descent,

It bounced right off her fingertips, into the pond it went.

With great dismay she watched it sink into the murky deep,

She could not reach nor even swim, and so began to weep.

 

“Alas! If I could have my ball, there’s nothing I won’t give!

My jewels, my clothes, my very crown – without these I can live.

But not my ball; my mother’s gift, please don’t say it’s lost!

I’d have it back safe in my hands, indeed, at any cost!”

 

By the pond she sat for hours, such bitter tears she cried.

Then with a shriek she jumped in fright: a frog was sat beside!

A slimy hand upon her skirt, with giant eyes he gazed,

Then hopped onto the poor girls lap. She stared at him, amazed…

Whose Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?…Anyone?

I saw this in the newspaper a few weeks ago and found it very sad.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-17024101

I think it’s such a shame these days that children are not getting to enjoy these wonderful fairy tales as they were originally written: as tales laced with danger and a sinister, dark atmosphere. In the world of the Brothers Grimm danger lurked around every corner. Children were not safe and rarely protected from evil by their parents, in fact in most cases their parents/step parents were the source of the evil. The bad guys had no shred of humanity and no back story to explain how they had become the way they were. Not all the characters were innately good, even the hero’s and heroines, and the bad guys could not always be “saved” in the end, be it through repentance or an act of self-sacrificing goodness. What’s more the main antagonists, more often that not, met with very grisly ends! The witch in Hansel and Gretel burned to death in her own oven, Cinderella’s evil stepsisters had their eyes plucked out by birds, Red Riding Hood’s wolf was brutally hacked to death by the woodsman and Snow Whites stepmother was forced to wear iron shoes and dance till she dropped dead!

Naturally it is quite right that some parents may consider these details too graphic for young children and may feel the need to tone them down, as they already have been over the years. But choosing not to tell them at all is just a bit too drastic in my opinion. These tales have been around for hundreds of years. Even the Brothers Grimm were not the original writers. They gathered their stories from various story-tellers, peasants, servants and even aristocrats who in turn had had these tales passed on to them. They really are timeless tales and they certainly didn’t do me any harm! The darkness and the danger made them more thrilling to hear and to read. These tales also convey important moral messages to children: the dangers of talking to strangers and straying from the path (Little Red Riding Hood), the destructive nature of vanity (Snow White), the repercussions of boasting and bragging (Rumpelstiltskin) and the consequences of failing to pay what is owed/ breaking a promise (The Pied Piper). 

I think one of the worst retellings I have heard so far is for Little Red Riding Hood, whereby instead of eating Grandma to snare his prey, the “Big Bad Wolf” has tea with her and Little Red Riding Hood and then goes on his merry way! Fairy tales should never be dull like that. Whilst they should always be enchanting, magical and even romantic, they should also be exciting, unpredictable, dangerous, scary, sinister and disturbing. It seems like a lot to ask from a short story doesn’t it? But trying giving Snow White, Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty another read (the original versions of course) and you’ll find all the above in those stories, which is really quite amazing isn’t it…?